Correlation Between Environmental Racism and Gentrification in Urban Areas

What does it mean to grow a community? How do you cultivate the soil, care for the plant, harvest the fruit? Join us for a conversation on January 30, 2018 with Rev. Tyler Sit and Armel Martin from New Church City in Minneapolis, Minnesota to talk about what it means to wrestle with the reality of gentrification and to embrace the diversity built into the soil of our world.

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About

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Adam Haugeberg is the director of environmental justice at New City Church in Minneapolis. He has started a permaculture design and edible landscaping business in Atlanta, managed and helped design a 350acre permaculture demonstration site in southern Missouri, and worked with several churches and non-profits in the area of environmental justice.  His calling is to create sustainable, equitable, and abundant systems that serve God, create justice for people, and harmonize with the earth.

The Rev. Tyler Sit is the church planter of New City Church, a Minneapolis-based church that focuses on environmental justice. New City has been featured in The New York Times, on Minnesota Public Radio, and on the website Patheos. The church’s ministry was named one of the “50 Environmental Projects to Watch” by online magazine Grist. Tyler is an outdoors enthusiast and on the side designs communications for an urban garden program.

 

 

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GCORR is building the capacity of The United Methodist Church to be contextually relevant and to reach more people, younger people, and more diverse people as we make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world.